Chevrolet Speaks to Homeschoolers

Louis_Chevrolet_400

No, this isn’t about baseball and apple pie, nor is it about “the heartbeat of America.” In fact, it’s not even about the automobile specifically, but rather the man behind the automobile; Louis Chevrolet. It was 98 years ago today that Louis Chevrolet and his partner Will Durant officially entered the automobile market- competing against Henry Ford’s Model T.

Durant was the business man and Chevrolet was the engineer, having designed and built his own overhead valve 6-cylinder engine. Chevrolet was also a race car driver, having met Durant when Durant hired him to race Buicks for the company.

Together, the pair teamed up to form what would eventually become the best-selling motor car company in American history. But before that happened, there was a disagreement over the design of the Chevrolet and Chevrolet sold his interest in the company to Durant. Durant later merged Chevrolet into General Motors.

Louis Chevrolet died penniless at age 62. In one of the worst business deals in history, Chevrolet had sold the birthright to his automobile- indeed he had sold his own name.

It reminds me of the story of Esau and Jacob in Genesis 25. As you recall, Esau sold his birthright for a bowl of stew that Jacob had prepared. Esau’s hungry stomach ruled his heart and head in another terrible business deal.

Did you know that you have certain birthrights? One of those is the right to teach your own children. But every day some of us are choosing to sell our birthright for a few dollars by enrolling our children in charter schools and other quasi-government programs in exchange for a free computer or free textbooks. Like Louis Chevrolet and Esau- we’ve sold our inheritance for a pittance.

Purpose in your heart today to follow the Lord on this homeschooling journey. If HE tells you to enroll your children in school then do it cheerfully and obediently. But if financial pressures and “hunger” tempt you to sell your long-term birthright for a “bowl of stew” today, remember the story of Louis Chevrolet who died penniless after selling his own name and design to someone else.

 

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1 Response so far »

  1. 1

    Jennifer said,

    Thanks Steve, for another good reminder!


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